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In the current social climate abuse amongst teenagers often manifests itself primarily as coercive control and through digital or electronic mechanisms.These forms of abuse are often challenging to identify because they are extremely normalized in society and at the same time, inherently more private.Some early intervention programs, such as those for Battering Intervention & Prevention (BIPP), are only made available to teens in the juvenile justice system.

A study published in 2010, for example, recommends pediatricians and school health providers must inquire about behaviors, not identity, to determine teens’ risk for contracting a sexually transmitted infection; similarly, when assessing for abuse, as a best practice, behaviors ought to be the main subject of inquiry.Among adult victims of rape, physical violence, and/or stalking by an intimate partner, 22% of women and 15% of men first experienced some form of partner violence between 11 and 17 years of age (National Center for Injury Prevention and Control Division of Violence Prevention).Nearly 1.5 million high school students nationwide experience physical abuse from a dating partner in a single year.Of primary concern are aspects of life over which adults have much more control, for example, teens may have little input over their schedules, which schools they attend, how to get to and from school, activities in which to participate, where they work, or where they worship.Additionally, many teen and adult victims alike experience abuse which intersects with discrimination and institutional biases based on race, culture, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity, immigration status, and language barriers among others, that make abuse harder to overcome and create additional challenges to receiving desperately needed services.

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