Kb home backdating

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And he still gave his cell-phone number to every hard case he met. Once, a day or two away from failing to make payroll, Boyle found an elderly woman at his door with a paper bag full of cash, thousands and thousands of dollars. Bruce Karatz read about those layoffs in the paper.In those days, Homeboy was small enough that a bag of cash could cover a shortfall. He was at his weekend home in Malibu, with his wife, Lilly Tartikoff, the widow of former NBC Entertainment president Brandon Tartikoff.It was also possible that, at 64, he could spend the rest of his life in federal prison. From 1986 to 2006, Karatz was CEO of KB Home, cofounded in the 1950s by a young accountant named Eli Broad.Karatz grew Broad’s first company into one of the world’s largest home builders.

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Most of the violence he sees, he chalks up to hurt and depression. A large foundation, the California Endowment, was planning to convert an old hospital building into a community center and offered Boyle the industrial kitchen–a 35,000-square-foot space, larger than Homeboy’s entire headquarters. (“I put Father Greg in the category of two or three supremely magical people I’ve met in my life,” said Robert K.One Sunday late last summer, just after Mass, Father Gregory Boyle took a drive through Boyle Heights, the East Los Angeles neighborhood where he has lived for 26 years. Tough young men rushed to the curb to rest tattooed forearms against his open window.That they share a name, the priest and his neighborhood, is a coincidence. People beamed when they saw Boyle’s old Toyota turn up their street. Boyle greeted them, slapping hands and bumping fists.His car had been towed, which was an especially big deal because he’d been living in it, a fact that shocked everyone. Veronica Vargas, Homeboy’s director of operations, spoke up: “This would probably add another

Most of the violence he sees, he chalks up to hurt and depression. A large foundation, the California Endowment, was planning to convert an old hospital building into a community center and offered Boyle the industrial kitchen–a 35,000-square-foot space, larger than Homeboy’s entire headquarters. (“I put Father Greg in the category of two or three supremely magical people I’ve met in my life,” said Robert K.

One Sunday late last summer, just after Mass, Father Gregory Boyle took a drive through Boyle Heights, the East Los Angeles neighborhood where he has lived for 26 years. Tough young men rushed to the curb to rest tattooed forearms against his open window.

That they share a name, the priest and his neighborhood, is a coincidence. People beamed when they saw Boyle’s old Toyota turn up their street. Boyle greeted them, slapping hands and bumping fists.

His car had been towed, which was an especially big deal because he’d been living in it, a fact that shocked everyone. Veronica Vargas, Homeboy’s director of operations, spoke up: “This would probably add another $1.5 million to our operating budget.”“A year from now,” Boyle said.

Conversation turned to a woman whom conversation often turned to. (Shoaf came in quietly and took a seat.) “But where will the revenue come from? “We don’t need to say how we’ll use the space, or what our plan is. “All we need is a yes.”“And that is the spirit that built Homeboy,” Karatz said. “It has brought us to the brink many times,” Boyle admitted.

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Most of the violence he sees, he chalks up to hurt and depression. A large foundation, the California Endowment, was planning to convert an old hospital building into a community center and offered Boyle the industrial kitchen–a 35,000-square-foot space, larger than Homeboy’s entire headquarters. (“I put Father Greg in the category of two or three supremely magical people I’ve met in my life,” said Robert K.One Sunday late last summer, just after Mass, Father Gregory Boyle took a drive through Boyle Heights, the East Los Angeles neighborhood where he has lived for 26 years. Tough young men rushed to the curb to rest tattooed forearms against his open window.That they share a name, the priest and his neighborhood, is a coincidence. People beamed when they saw Boyle’s old Toyota turn up their street. Boyle greeted them, slapping hands and bumping fists.His car had been towed, which was an especially big deal because he’d been living in it, a fact that shocked everyone. Veronica Vargas, Homeboy’s director of operations, spoke up: “This would probably add another $1.5 million to our operating budget.”“A year from now,” Boyle said.Conversation turned to a woman whom conversation often turned to. (Shoaf came in quietly and took a seat.) “But where will the revenue come from? “We don’t need to say how we’ll use the space, or what our plan is. “All we need is a yes.”“And that is the spirit that built Homeboy,” Karatz said. “It has brought us to the brink many times,” Boyle admitted.

.5 million to our operating budget.”“A year from now,” Boyle said.Conversation turned to a woman whom conversation often turned to. (Shoaf came in quietly and took a seat.) “But where will the revenue come from? “We don’t need to say how we’ll use the space, or what our plan is. “All we need is a yes.”“And that is the spirit that built Homeboy,” Karatz said. “It has brought us to the brink many times,” Boyle admitted.

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